St Clement’s Church, Rodel, Harris

By John MacLean, 24/02/14

 

Last week I paid a visit to St Clement’s church in Rodel, south Harris, spending two hours in very clement weather 😉 taking exterior and interior photographs of this striking building (sometimes referred to in Gaelic as ‘Eaglais Roghadail’ or ‘Tur Chliamainn’).

The church, built from local Lewisian gneiss for the chiefs of the MacLeods of Harris, is in a spectacular location looking out to the south-west over the Sound of Harris towards the Uists.

 

       St Clement’s is considered to be one of the most outstanding church buildings in the Hebrides, the earliest section dating from the 13th century. The church is remarkable for possessing one of the most ambitious and richly-carved tombs of the period in Scotland, that of Alexander Macleod (known in Gaelic as Alasdair Crotach) said to have been the church’s founder.

By choosing to be buried in Harris, Alexander Macleod was breaking with tradition, as the previous chiefs of his clan had until then been buried in Iona. The tomb is dated 1528 and its high-quality carved mural panels depict biblical stories, a stylised castle, a hunting scene and a Highland galley.

[Source: RCAHMS]

                                         St Clement's, Rodel            St Clement's church, Rodel

 

                                                St Clement's, Rodel                       St Clement's, Rodel, Harris

 

 

Xmas

By John MacLean, 10/12/2013:

 

Upper Coll, Isle of Lewis

 

December’s Loch a Tuath News magazine: the cover photo was taken literally just a few yards from the top of the family croft in Upper Coll, looking towards Coll on a rare day of fairly deep snow three or four winters back.
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Old and new

By John MacLean, 08/12/2013:

 

Sonas: Isobel Ann Martin CD.

 

One of my old black & white portraits from the 1990s has been used on the cover of Isobel Ann Martin’s excellent new CD ‘Sonas’, out now!
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Press photography

By John MacLean, 15/11/13:

 

French newspaper Libération removes all photographs from its 14th November issue to highlight both the value of images and the precarious state of professional press photography.

“A visual shock. For the first time in its history, Libération is published without photographs. In their place: a series of empty frames that create a form of silence; an uncomfortable one. It’s noticeable, information is missing, as if we had become a mute newspaper.”

 

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Events – St Kilda

By John MacLean, 06/09/13:

 

Events newspaper            Events newspaper

 

There is a 4-page (almost) article in the September ‘Events’ newspaper on my recent trip to St Kilda, accompanied by a selection of landscape photos.
 

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In Praise of Peat

By John MacLean, 02/09/13:

 

An Lanntair, Stornoway

 

At the opening of the An Lanntair exhibition ‘Moladh na Mòine: In Praise of Peat’, comprising a full scale peatstack, a vintage tractor, a collection of peat cutting irons, a glossary of peatcutting terms taking up an entire wall of the gallery, and a selection of huge prints of old photographs from local historical society archives. Sweet.
 

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Year of Natural Scotland 2013

By John MacLean, 26/07/13

 

Callanish Stones in snow, Lewis

 

One of my panoramic photos of the Callanish Stones in snow has been included in Our Dynamic Earth’s current photographic exhibition on Scotland’s natural environment, showing in Edinburgh until Christmas.
[Photo: Our Dynamic Earth]
 

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Dropbox

By John MacLean, 12/07/13:

 

As well as being able to download photos from a private folder on my own webspace, clients now have the added option of using a Dropbox account for downloading pics at high resolution.

 

 

Midsummer Live at Callanish

By John MacLean, 22/06/13:

 

BBC Callanish Live            BBC Callanish Live

 

Callanish was a gathering place for many tourists and locals last night as BBC 2 Scotland broadcast its Midsummer Live show from the Standing Stones, with presenters Dougie Vipond and Ellie Harrison making the best of having to host a midsummer event during which the sun didn’t even make a hint of an appearance. Despite a good forecast from the previous day, it was heavy grey cloud all the way, turning to rain as the live broadcast entered its final section after 10 o’ clock.
Never mind, everyone seemed to enjoy the event despite the dreich weather…
 

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